Tag Archives: zementa

exercise

_ _ _ _ Exercise stimulates tissue change and adaptation (eg, increase in muscle mass and strength, cardiovascular endurance), whereas rest and recovery allow such change and adaptation to occur. Recovery from exercise is as important as the exercise stimulus. Regular physical activity reduces the likelihood of medical illness, decreases the incidence of the major […]

benzodiazepine addication

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ Anxiolytics and sedatives (hypnotics) include benzodiazepines, barbiturates, and related drugs. High doses can cause stupor and respiratory depression, which is managed with intubation and mechanical ventilation. Chronic users may have a withdrawal syndrome of agitation and seizures, so dependence is managed by slow tapering with or without substitution […]

drug dependence

_ _ _ _ Some people who use drugs use large enough amounts often enough and long enough to become dependent. Definitions A single definition for drug dependence is elusive. Concepts that aid in defining drug dependence are tolerance and psychologic and physical dependence. Tolerance describes the need to progressively increase the drug dose to […]

happiness forever

_ _ _ _ _ On Happiness foreverIs happiness forever desirable? it is not.happiness can only be understood in the context of sadness and without sadness happiness is a disease process leading to complications ..A paper describes happiness forever as a medical diseaseBut all this later Today in an entertaining talk on happiness forever by […]

drug receptor interactions

_ _ _ _ Receptors are macromolecules involved in chemical signaling between and within cells; they may be located on the cell surface membrane or within the cytoplasm (see Table 1: Pharmacodynamics: Some Types of Physiologic and Drug–Receptor Proteins). Activated receptors directly or indirectly regulate cellular biochemical processes (eg, ion conductance, protein phosphorylation, DNA transcription, […]

receptor interactions

_ _ _ _ _ _ Receptors are macromolecules involved in chemical signaling between and within cells; they may be located on the cell surface membrane or within the cytoplasm (see Table 1: Pharmacodynamics: Some Types of Physiologic and Drug-Receptor Proteins). Activated receptors directly or indirectly regulate cellular biochemical processes (eg, ion conductance, protein phosphorylation, […]

headache

_ _ _ _ _ Headache is pain in any part of the head, including the scalp, face (including the orbitotemporal area), and interior of the head. Headache is one of the most common reasons patients seek medical attention. Pathophysiology Headache is due to activation of pain-sensitive structures in or around the brain, skull, face, […]

huntington’s chorea

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ (Huntington’s Chorea; Chronic Progressive Chorea; Hereditary Chorea) Huntington’s disease is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by chorea and progressive cognitive deterioration, usually beginning in middle age. Diagnosis is by genetic testing. Treatment is supportive. First-degree relatives are encouraged to have genetic testing. Huntington’s disease affects both sexes […]

fragile x associated tremors/ataxia syndrome

_ Fragile X–associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a genetic disorder affecting mostly men and causing tremor, ataxia, and dementia. FXTAS affects about 1/3000 men. A premutation (an increased number of CGG repeats) occurs in the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene on the X chromosome; if the mutation is full, > 200 repeats occur, causing […]

chorea

_ _ _ Chorea is nonrhythmic, jerky, rapid, nonsuppressible involuntary movements, mostly of distal muscles or the face; movements may merge imperceptibly into purposeful or semipurposeful acts that mask the involuntary movements. Athetosis is nonrhythmic, slow, writhing, sinuous movements predominantly in distal muscles, often alternating with postures of the proximal limbs to produce a continuous, […]

cerebellar dysfunctions

_ _ Voluntary movement requires interaction of the corticospinal (pyramidal) tracts, basal ganglia, and cerebellum (the center for motor coordination). The pyramidal tracts pass through the medullary pyramids to connect the cerebral cortex to lower motor centers of the brain stem and spinal cord. The basal ganglia (caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, and […]

demyelinating diseases

Myelin sheaths cover many nerve fibers in the central and peripheral nervous system; they accelerate axonal transmission of neural impulses. Disorders that affect myelin interrupt nerve transmission; symptoms may reflect deficits in any part of the nervous system. Myelin formed by oligodendroglia in the CNS differs chemically and immunologically from that formed by Schwann cells […]

weakness

Weakness is one of the most common reasons patients present to primary care clinicians. Weakness is loss of muscle strength, although many patients also use the term when they feel generally fatigued or have functional limitations (eg, due to pain or limited joint motion) even though muscle strength is normal. Weakness may affect a few […]

memory loss

_ _ _ _ Memory loss is a common complaint in the primary care setting. It is particularly common among the elderly but also may be reported by younger people. Sometimes family members rather than the patient report the memory loss (typically in an elderly person, often one with dementia). Clinicians and patients are often […]

brief psychotic disorder

_ Brief psychotic disorder consists of delusions, hallucinations, or other psychotic symptoms for at least 1 day but < 1 mo, with eventual return to normal premorbid functioning. It is typically caused by severe stress in susceptible people. Brief psychotic disorder is uncommon. Preexisting personality disorders (eg, paranoid, histrionic, narcissistic, schizotypal, borderline) predispose to its […]

schizophreniform psychosis

_ _ _ Schizoaffective disorder is characterized by significant mood symptoms, psychosis, and other symptoms of schizophrenia. It is differentiated from schizophrenia by occurrence of ≥ 1 episodes of depressive or manic symptoms. Schizoaffective disorder is considered when a psychotic patient also demonstrates mood symptoms. The diagnosis requires that significant mood symptoms (depressive or manic) […]

medical causes of psychosis

Differential Diagnosis of Psychotic Symptoms: Medical “Mimics” By Oliver Freudenreich, MD | December 3, 2012 For a pdf of the original article (Psychiatr Times. 2010;27[12]:52-61) and Dr Freudenreich’s bio and financial disclosure, please click here. Crude exogenous organic damage of the most varying kind can produce acute psychotic clinical pictures of a basically uniform kind. […]

24 steps on how to prevent rape

Do not be distracted, especially by technology. Do not jog with your iPod because attackers are looking for easy, distracted individuals who look-like they are not paying attention to surroundings. The same can be said for talking on your cell phone. But, on the other hand, if you feel someone is following you, pull out […]

television

29 December 2012 14:41:34 Dr Harish Shetty A review of 35 academic studies by Dr Aric Sigman of the British Psychological Society has revealed the top 15 ways in which long hours before the telly can affect children’s health as they grow 1 Obesity: a result of little exercise 2 Disrupted hormones: light from televisions […]

cannabis

f you discover eye drops such as I CURE / I CUL in anybody’s belongings than the person is surely taking addictive drugs Harish Shetty When Ms Ghorpade found eye drops in the bag of her teenage son she was surprised. She did not recollect any visit to the eye doctor or any problem with […]