Guidelines for Setting up Isolation Facility

 

COVID -19 Outbreak

Guidelines for Setting up Isolation Facility/Ward

National Centre for Disease Control 22 Sham Nath Marg, Delhi 110054 Directorate General of Health Services Ministry of Health and Family Welfare

Government of India

Table of Contents

A. Quarantine and isolation 1

B. Setting up isolation facility/ward 2

C. Checklist for isolation rooms 4

D. Wearing and removing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 5

E. Transport of Infectious Patients 6

Annexure I Annexure II

              

WHO has declared the COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak as Public Health Emergency of international concern and has raised the risk assessment of China, Regional Level and Global Level to Very High and “all countries should be prepared for containment, including active surveillance, early detection, isolation and case management, contact tracing and prevention of onward spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Among the factors affecting cluster containment, Isolation of cases and quarantine of contacts is the mainstay of outbreak containment.

Scope of document: This guidance document has been prepared to establish an isolation facility at the level of district hospital, a secondary health care facility.

A. Quarantine and isolation

Quarantine and Isolation are important mainstay of cluster containment. These measures help by breaking the chain of transmission in the community.

Quarantine

Quarantine refers to separation of individuals who are not yet ill but have been exposed to COVID-19 and therefore have a potential to become ill. There will be voluntary home quarantine of contacts of suspect /confirmed cases. The guideline on home quarantine available on the website of the Ministry provides detail guidance on home quarantine.

Isolation refers to separation of individuals who are ill and suspected or confirmed of COVID-19. All suspect cases detected in the containment/buffer zones (till a diagnosis is made), will be hospitalized and kept in isolation in a designated facility till such time they are tested negative. Persons testing positive for COVID-19 will remain to be hospitalized till such time 2 of their samples are tested negative as per MoHFW’s discharge policy. About 15% of the patients are likely to develop pneumonia, 5 % of whom requires ventilator management.

Hence dedicated Intensive care beds need to be identified earmarked. Some among them may progress to multi organ failure and hence critical care facility/ dialysis facility/ and Salvage therapy [Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenator (ECMO)] facility for managing the respiratory/renal complications/ multi-organ failure shall be required. If such facilities are not available in the containment zone, nearest tertiary care facility in Government / private sector needs to be identified, that becomes a part of the micro-plan.

There are various modalities of isolating a patient. Ideally, patients can be isolated in individual isolation rooms or negative pressure rooms with 12 or more air-changes per hour.
In resource constrained settings, all positive COVID-19 cases can be cohorted in a ward with good ventilation. Similarly, all suspect cases should also be cohorted in a separate

1

ward. However under no circumstances these cases should be mixed up. A minimum distance of 1 meter needs to be maintained between adjacent beds. All such patients need to wear a triple layer surgical mask at all times.
Nosocomial infection in fellow patients and attending healthcare personnel are well documented in the current COVID-19 outbreak as well. There shall be strict adherence to Infection prevention control practices in all health facilities. IPC committees would be formed (if not already in place) with the mandate to ensure that all healthcare personnel are well aware of IPC practices and suitable arrangements for requisite PPE and other logistic (hand sanitizer, soap, water etc.) are in place. The designated hospitals will ensure that all healthcare staff is trained in washing of hands, respiratory etiquettes, donning/doffing & proper disposal of PPEs and bio-medical waste management.

At all times doctors, nurses and para-medics working in the clinical areas will wear three layered surgical mask and gloves. The medical personnel working in isolation and critical care facilities will wear full complement of PPE (including N95 masks).
The support staff engaged in cleaning and disinfection will also wear full complement of PPE. Environmental cleaning should be done twice daily and consist of damp dusting and floor mopping with Lysol or other phenolic disinfectants and cleaning of surfaces with sodium hypochlorite solution. Detailed guidelines available on MoHFW’s website may be followed.

B. Setting up isolation facility/ward

 At State level, a minimum of 50 bed isolation ward should be established.
 At District level, a minimum of 10 bed isolation ward should be established.

  COVID-19 patients should be housed in single rooms.

  However, if sufficient single rooms are not available, beds could be put with a
spatial separation of at least 1 meter (3 feet) from one another.

  To create a 10 bed facility, a minimum space of 2000 sq. feet area clearly
segregated from other patientcare areas is required.

  Preferably the isolation ward should have a separate entry/exit and should not be
co-located with post-surgical wards/dialysis unit/SNCU/labour room etc.

  It should be in a segregated area which is not frequented by outsiders.

  The access to isolation ward should be through dedicated lift/guarded stairs.

An isolation facility aims to control the airflow in the room so that the number of airborne infectious particles is reduced to a level that ensures cross-infection of other people within a healthcare facility is highly unlikely.

  Post signages on the door indicating that the space is an isolation area.

  Remove all non-essential furniture and ensure that the remaining furniture is easy
to clean, and does not conceal or retain dirt or moisture within or around it.

2

  There should be double door entry with changing room and nursing station. Enough PPE should be available in the changing room with waste disposal bins to collect used PPEs.Used PPEs should be disposedas per the BMWM guidelines.

  Place a puncture-proof container for sharps disposal inside the isolation room/area and bio-medical waste should be managed as per the BMWM guidelines.

  Keep the patient’s personal belongings to a minimum. Keep water pitchers and cups, tissue wipes, and all items necessary for attending to personal hygiene within the patient’s reach.

  Non-critical patient-care equipment (e.g. stethoscope, thermometer, blood pressure cuff, and sphygmomanometer) should be dedicated for the patient, if possible. Any patient-care equipment that is required for use by other patients should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected before use.

  Stock the PPE supply and linen outside the isolation room or area (e.g. in the change room). Setup a trolley outside the door to hold PPE. A checklist may be useful to ensure that all equipment is available.

  Place appropriate waste bags in a bin. If possible, use a touch-free bin. Ensure that used (i.e. dirty) bins remain inside the isolation rooms.

  Place an appropriate container with a lid outside the door for equipment that requires disinfection or sterilization.

  Ensure that appropriate hand washing facilities and hand-hygiene supplies are available. Stock the sink area with suitable supplies for hand washing, and with alcohol-based hand rub, near the point of care and the room door.

  Ensure adequate room ventilation. If room is air-conditioned, ensure 12 air changes/ hour and filtering of exhaust air. A negative pressure in isolation rooms is desirable for patients requiring aerosolization procedures (intubation, suction nebulisation). These rooms may have standalone air-conditioning. These areas should not be a part of the central air-conditioning.

  If air-conditioning is not available negative pressure could also be created through putting up 3-4 exhaust fans driving air out of the room.

  In district hospital, where there is sufficient space, natural ventilation may be followed. Such isolation facility should have large windows on opposite walls of the room allowing a natural unidirectional flow and air changes. The principle of natural ventilation is to allow and enhance the flow of outdoor air by natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy forces from one opening to another to achieve the desirable air change per hour.

  The isolation ward should have a separate toilet with proper cleaning and supplies.

  Avoid sharing of equipment, but if unavoidable, ensure that reusable equipment is
appropriately disinfected between patients.

3

 Ensure regular cleaning and proper disinfection of common areas, and adequate hand hygiene by patients, visitors and care givers.Keep adequate equipment required for cleaning or disinfection inside the isolation room or area, and ensure scrupulous daily cleaning of the isolation room or area.

  Visitors to the isolation facility should be restricted /disallowed. For unavoidable entries, they should use PPE according to the hospital guidance, and should be instructed on its proper use and in hand hygiene practices prior to entry into the isolation room/area.

  Doctors, nurses and paramedics posted to isolation facility need to be dedicated and not allowed to work in other patient-care areas.

  Consider having designated portable X-ray and portable ultrasound equipment.

  Corridors with frequent patient transport should be well-ventilated.

  All health staff involved in patient care should be well trained in the use of PPE.

 Ensure that visitors consult the health-care worker in charge (who is also responsible for keeping a visitor record) before being allowed into the isolation areas. Keep a roster of all staff working in the isolation areas, for possible outbreak

investigation and contact tracing.

 Set up a telephone or other method of communication in the isolation room or area to enable patients, family members or visitors to communicate with health-care workers. This may reduce the number of times the workers need to don PPE to enter the room or area.

C. Checklist for isolation rooms

  Eye protection (visor or goggles)

  Face shield (provides eye, nose and mouth protection)

  Gloves

  reusable vinyl or rubber gloves for environmental cleaning

  latex single-use gloves for clinical care

  Hair covers

  Particulate respirators (N95, FFP2, or equivalent)

  Medical (surgical or procedure) masks

  Gowns and aprons

  single-use long-sleeved fluid-resistant or reusable non-fluid-resistant gowns

  plastic aprons (for use over non-fluid-resistant gowns if splashing is anticipated
and if fluid-resistant gowns are not available)

  Alcohol-based hand rub

  Plain soap (liquid if possible, for washing hands in clean water)

  Clean single-use towels (e.g. paper towels)

  Sharps containers

4

 Appropriate detergent for environmental cleaning and for disinfection of surfaces, instruments or equipment

disinfectant

  Large plastic bags

  Appropriate clinical waste bags

  Linen bags

  Collection container for used equipment

  Standard IEC

  Standard protocols for hand hygiene, sample collection and BMW displayed clearly

  Standard Clinical management protocols

D. Wearing and removing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Before entering the isolation room or area:

  Collect all equipment needed;

  Perform hand hygiene with an alcohol-based hand rub (preferably when hands are
not visibly soiled) or soap and water;

  Put on PPE in the order that ensures adequate placement of PPE items and prevent
self-contamination and self-inoculation while using and taking off PPE; an example of the order in which to don PPE when all PPE items are needed is hand hygiene, gown, mask or respirator, eye protection and gloves

Leaving the isolation room or area

  Either remove PPE in the anteroom or, if there is no anteroom, make sure that the PPE will not contaminate either the environment outside the isolation room or area, or other people.

  Remove PPE in a manner that prevents self-contamination or self-inoculation with contaminated PPE or hands. General principles are:

–  remove the most contaminated PPE items first;

–  perform hand hygiene immediately after removing gloves;

–  remove the mask or particulate respirator last (by grasping the ties and
discarding in a rubbish bin);

–  discard disposable items in a closed rubbish bin;

–  put reusable items in a dry (e.g. without any disinfectant solution) closed
container; an example of the order in which to take off PPE when all PPE items are needed is gloves (if the gown is disposable, gloves can be peeled off together with gown upon removal), hand hygiene, gown, eye protection, mask or respirator, and hand hygiene

– Perform hand hygiene with an alcohol-based hand rub (preferably) or soap and water whenever un-gloved hands touch contaminated PPE items.

5

 

E. Transport of Infectious Patients

It is recommended that transport of infectious patients is limited to movement considered medically essential by the clinicians, e.g. for diagnostic or treatment purposes. Where infectious patients are required to be transported to other units within the hospital or outside the following precautions may be implemented:

 Infected or colonised areas of the patient’s body are covered: – For contact isolation this may include a gown, sheets or dressings to surface wounds; these patients are transferred to a Standard Pressure or Protective Environment Isolation room – For respiratory isolation the patient is dressed in a mask, gown and covered in sheets;

these patients are accommodated in a Negative Pressure Isolation Room – For quarantine isolation the patient may be transported in a fully enclosed transport cell or isolator with a filtered air supply and exhaust; these patients are accommodated in a high level quarantine isolation suite.

  The transport personnel remove existing PPE, cleanse hands and transport the patient on a wheelchair, bed or trolley, applying clean PPE to transport the patients and when handling the patient at the destination. Gown-up and gown-down rooms located at the entry to a Unit will assist the staff to enter and exit the facility according to the strict infection control protocols required, thereby reducing the risk of contamination

  The destination unit should be contacted and notified prior to the transfer to ensure suitable accommodation on arrival.

  It is preferred that the patient is transported through staff and service corridors, not public access corridors During planning stages, design can assist transfer of infectious patients by providing service corridors and strategically placed lifts, capable of separation from other lifts. The nominated lift may be isolated from public and staff transit through access control measures and cleaned following transit of the infectious patient.

  Design may also incorporate a designated floor for horizontal bed transfers of infectious patients away from busy clinical areas. The designated floor may be located at mid-level in the hospital

 A combination of nominated lifts, corridors and a bed transfer floor would assist in the movement of infectious patients through the hospital and minimise the risk of spread of infection.

6

Annexure I

  Gloves

  reusable vinyl or rubber gloves for environmental cleaning

  latex single-use gloves for clinical care

  Hair covers

  Particulate respirators (N95, FFP2, or equivalent)

  Medical (surgical or procedure) masks

  Gowns and aprons

  single-use long-sleeved fluid-resistant or reusable non-fluid-resistant gowns

  plastic aprons (for use over non-fluid-resistant gowns if splashing is anticipated

 

Checklist for isolation rooms

  Eye protection (visor or goggles)

  Face shield (provides eye, nose and mouth protection)

and if fluid-resistant gowns are not available)

  Alcohol-based hand rub

  Plain soap (liquid if possible, for washing hands in clean water)

  Clean single-use towels (e.g. paper towels)

  Sharps containers

  Appropriate detergent for environmental cleaning and

disinfectant

for disinfection of surfaces, instruments or equipment

  Large plastic bags

  Appropriate clinical waste bags

  Linen bags

  Collection container for used equipment

  Standard IEC

  Standard protocols for hand hygiene, sample collection and BMW displayed clearly

  Standard Clinical management protocols

Annexure IIA

Hospital Preparedness & Isolation Facility Assessment Checklist – COVID19

I . GENERAL INFORMATION

1. Name of the healthcare facility (HCF)

2. Type

Public Private

3. Category of HCF

Primary Secondary Tertiary

4. Subcategory

PHC UPHC CHC Taluk/Sub-District Hospital
District Hospital General Hospital Medical College Hospital
Multi-Speciality Hospital Nursing Home Dispensary Clinic

5. Address of the health facility

. a)  Block

. b)  District

. c)  State

. d)  Email ID

. e)  Contact no.

6. Name of Director/ Principal/Medical superintendent

. a)  Email ID

. b)  Contact no.

7. Name of RMO/Hospital In-charge

. a)  Email ID

. b)  Contact no

8. Total number of inpatient beds

9. Total number of ICU beds

10. Average number of OPD attendance per month

11. Average number of new admissions /months

12. Bedoccupancyrate(Annual)

13. Total staff strength

      

Doctors – MBBS

Doctors- AYUSH

Clinical Specialists other than Intensivist/Pulmonologist

Non-Clinical specialists other than Microbiologist

 

Microbiologists

Intensivists #

Pulmonologist #

Int

Pulm

Senior Resident #

Junior Resident #

SR

JR

Interns

Nurses

Lab technicians

Pharmacists

Laboratory Technicians

Cleaning staff

Ambluance drivers

14. Does this HCF have a designated COVID 19 isolation facility

YesNo

II. HCF PREPAREDNESS TO MANAGE MAJOR EPIDEMICS & PANDEMICS

15. CoreEmergencyResponse/RapidResponseTeamforoutbreakmanagement identified?

Available In progressNot started

16. Roles and responsibilities of RRT/ERT clearly defined?

Available In progressNot started

17. Is there a contingency plan for covering for a core team member who is absent?

Available In progressNot started

18. MonitoringandmanagingHealthCarePersonnel(HCP)

. a)  The facility follows the Central/State public health policies/procedures for
monitoring and managing HCP with potential for exposure to COVID-19

. b)  The facility have a process to conduct symptom and temperature checks
prior to the start of duty shift for HCP

Yes No Yes No

19. TrainingforHealthcarePersonnel(HCP)
a) Education and job-specific training to HCP regarding

  Signs and symptoms of infection

  Triage procedures including patient placement and filling the CIF

  Safely collect clinical specimen

  Correct infection control practices and PPE use

  HCP sick leave policies

  Recommended actions for not using recommended PPE

  How and to whom suspected cases (COVID-19)should be reported

Completed In ProgressNot Started
Completed In ProgressNot Started Completed In ProgressNot Started Completed In ProgressNot Started Completed In ProgressNot Started Completed In ProgressNot Started

Completed In ProgressNot Started

III. TRIAGE

20. Triage protocols available at the healthcare facility?

Available In progress Not started

21. Availability of telemedicine facility as a way to provide clinical support without direct interaction with the patient

Available In progress Not started

22. Is there specific waiting area for people with respiratory symptoms?

23. Availability of designated ARI/COVID-19 triage area

Available In progress Not started

24. Dotheyhavenon-contactInfra-Redthermometeravailableneartheregistration desk?

25. Availability of signage directing to triage area and signage to instruct patients to alert staff if they have symptoms of COVID-19

Available In progress Not started

26. Dotheyhavededicated/singleexaminationroomsinTriagearea?(Dedicated room should satisfy criteria of one patient per room with door closed for examination)

Yes No

27. Triage area has signs/alerts about respiratory etiquette and hand hygiene?

Yes No

28. Does the HCF provide masks for patients with respiratory symptoms?

Yes No

29. Triage staff trained on revised COVID19 case definition and identify suspected cases ?

30. Screeningquestionnaireandalgorithmfortriageavailablewithstaff

31. Infraredthermometeravailablewiththetriagestaff

32. Waste bins and access to cleaning/ disinfection supplies available in Triage area

33. Physical barriers (e.g., glass or plastic screens) at reception areas available to limit close contact between triage staff and potentially infectious patients

34. Does the patient waiting area have cross ventilation

35. Waiting area cleaned at least twice daily with 0.5% hypochlorite solution (or) 70% alcohol for surfaces that do not tolerate chlorine

36. Does the hospital have dedicated infrastructure for isolation facility? (If No skip to Section IV)

37. Type of isolation Facility

IV Isolation Facility

Yes No

Available In progress Not started
Available In progress Not started

Available In progress Not started
Available In progress Not started

Yes No Yes No

Yes No
Temporary Permanent

Yes No

Available In progressNot started
Yes No
Available In progressNot started

Yes No
Available In progressNot started
RoomsWards

Yes No Yes No

Yes No

Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No

Yes No Yes No

Yes No Yes No

Yes No

38. IstheisolationfacilitynearOPD/IPD/othercrowdedarea?

39. Screening rooms identified and available at the isolation area?

40. Isthereseparateentrytotheisolationarea?

41. Dedicated space for staff to put on PPE while entering the isolated area

42. Isthereseparateexitforisolationarea?

43. DedicatedspaceforstafftotakeoffPPEnearexit?

44. Isolationfacilityisseparateandhasrooms/wards?

45. Are washrooms available as 1 toilet per 20 persons?

46. Number of beds in each isolation rooms/wards

47. Is the distance between two beds in isolation wards/rooms more than 1 meter?

48. Do the hospital have policy to segregate clinical staff (e.g. nurses) for care of COVID19 cases?

49. Whether PPEs available and located near point of use? a. Gloves

b. c. d.

Gowns Face masks

95 respirators

50. Whether the hospital limits the movement of patients in the isolation facility outside for medically necessary purposes only?

51. Are the known or suspected COVID19 patients placed on contact and droplet precautions?

52. Ifapatientleavestheirroomformedicalpurposes,aretheyprovidedfacemask ?

53. Do staff transporting the patient wear PPE?

54. While transporting patients are specific routes used to minimize contact with other patients and staff?

55. For a patient on Airborne Precautions, air pressure is monitored daily with visual indicators (e.g., smoke tubes, flutter strips), regardless of the presence of differential pressure sensing devices (e.g., manometers):

56. Are these isolation rooms/wards satisfying the criteria of negative pressure class N?

(Applicable if an aerosol generating procedure is performed)

Yes No

57. IsthereProvisionfoodintheisolationarea?

Available In progressNot started

58. Policyforleftoverfoodwastemanagement?

Available In progressNot started

59. Is there an ICU facility attached to isolation area?

Yes No

60. Availability of cross ventilation

Yes No

61. Isthereanydesignatedareaforsamplecollection?

Yes No

62. Are they following standard precautions and PPE while taking sample?

Yes No

63. Does the facility have a written policy for sample collection and transport?

Yes No

64. Arethesesampletransportedintriplepacking?

Yes No

65. Does the transportation package contain IATA DG code (UN3373)?

Yes No

66. Are they following standard precautions while transporting the sample?

Yes No

67. Are the floors of isolation facility suitable for moping?

Yes No

68. Isdrinkingwateravailableatisolationarea?

Yes No

69. Availability of management protocols for COVID19

Available In progressNot started

70. Is rotation roster of duty shift for staff posted at isolation facility

Available In progressNot started

71. Is there any protocol for limiting the entry of visitors at isolation area?

Available In progressNot started

72. Availability of separate Thermometers BP apparatus with adult & Pediatric cuffs?

Yes No

73. Availability of discharge policy for COVID19

Available In ProgressNot Started

IV. INFECTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL PRACTICES

74. Does the hospital have Hospital Infection control Committee (HICC)?

Yes No

75. Are there any infection control protocols/guidelines available?

Available In progressNot started

76. Functioning hand washing stations (including water, soap and paper towel or air dry) at isolation area?

77. Does the facility have uninterrupted running water supply?

Yes No

78. Isalcoholbasedhandsanitizeravailableatisolationarea?

Yes No

79. Are the staff following five movements of hand washing?

Yes No

80. Are the staff following six steps of hand washing?

Yes No

81. Is there posters to reinforce hand washing and PPE at hand washing stations

Available In progressNot started

VI. ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANING

82. Are objects and environmental surfaces in patient care areas touched frequently (e.g., bed rails, overbed table, bedside commode, lavatory surfaces) are cleaned

Yes No

83. Aretheydisinfectedwithanapproveddisinfectantfrequently(atleastdaily) and when visibly soiled?

Yes No

84. Istherecleaningchart?

Yes No

85. Frequency of cleaning of high touch areas, Bed rails, Tables, Chairs, Keyboards etc.,

86. Isthereanyhousekeepingpolicyavailableatisolationarea?

Yes No

87. Availabilityofterminalcleaningchecklist

Available In progressNot started

88. Availability of three bucket system

Yes No

89. Aretheyfollowingcorrectcontacttimefordisinfectionwithhypochlorite solution? (10 minutes for non-porous surfaces)

Yes No

90. Arethestafffollowingoutwardmoppingtechnique

Yes No

91. Availability of separate mops for each area

Yes No

92. Frequency of cleaning of isolation rooms?

93. Frequency of cleaning of ambulatory areas?

94. Frequency of cleaning of bathrooms of isolation areas?

95. StaffwearingPPEwhilecleaning a. Gloves

b. Masks c. Apron

Yes No Yes No Yes No

96. Arethestafftrainedinhousekeepingandinfectioncontrolpractices?

Yes No

97. Doctors, nurses & cleaning staff available/ shift at isolation area?

Yes No

98. Barrier nursing practiced at isolation area in 1:1 ratio?

Yes No

99. Isthereanypolicyforlinenmanagementforisolationfacility?

Available In progressNot started

100.What is the frequency of changing linen in isolation rooms?

Daily Alternate Days Weekly When Soiled

101.Type of linen used

Disposable Reusable

VII. BIOMEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT (BMWM)

102.Availability of SOP for BMW management?

Available In progressNot started

103.Availability of agreement with CWTF

Available In progressNot started

104.Are they following color codes bins in BMW management?

Yes No

105.Is there sufficient quantity color coded bags available?

Yes No

106.Are they disinfecting the waste before it is disposed?

Yes No

107.Method of disposing biomedical wastes?

CWTF Deep burial Incineration

108. Disposal of sharps as per the standard protocol?

Yes No

109.Availability of biomedical waste trolley?

Yes No

110.Availability of dedicated BMW collection area?

Yes No

111.BMW collected from isolation facility within 48hrs?

Yes No

VIII. ICU FACILITY

112.Are there any beds dedicated for COVID 19 infection?

Yes No

113. If Yes, Number of beds dedicated to COVID 19 cases?

114.Is the distance between beds in ICU more than 1 meter?

Yes No

115.Is the oxygen supply is by cylinder or central connection?

116.Are there any separate Ventilators, nebulizers, Infusion pumps in ICU?

Yes No

117.Adequate supply of masks, ET tubes, PPE kits available at ICU?

Yes No

118.All ICU Staff received training in donning & doffing of PPE?

Completed In progressNot started

119.Are there separate area for donning & doffing of PPE?

Yes No

120.Hand washing facility & hand sanitizer available at donning & doffing areas?

Yes No

XII.OTHER ESSENTIAL SERVICES

121.Is there strategy available for optimizing the PPE supply

Available In progressNot started

122.Are there any stockout experience for PPEs in the las year.

Yes No

123.Designated ambulance facility for transporting patients from isolation area?

Yes No

124.list of contact numbers of ambulance drivers displayed at isolation area?

Available In progressNot started

125.Ambulance staff trained in wearing PPE & and other Infection control practices?

Yes No

126.SOP for disinfecting ambulance after transporting confirmed case/dead body?

Available In progressNot started

127.Written protocol available for disposing dead bodies of confirmed cases?

Available In progressNot started

128.Is there enough availability of body bags?

Yes No

129.Are the staff trained in handling dead bodies and wearing PPE?

Yes No

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: